Black History

Tuskegee Airmen

tuskegee airmen1

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Black History

the men who change the nation
Caption: Class 44-I-SE1 graduated from flight training on Oct. 16, 1944, at Tuskegee Army Air Field in Alabama.

Order unknown: Cornelius D. Dowling, Henry A. Hunter, Ferrier F. White, Rutherford H. Adkins, Thomas J. Daniels III, Edward D. Doram, Robert M. Glass, James H. Harvey Jr., Frank A. Jackson Jr. Theodore W. Lancaster, Charles E. Miller, Joseph M. Millett, Charles P. Myers, Richard A. Simons, Richard G. Stevens, Charles L. Stovall, Donald N. Thompson Jr., Richard E. Thorpe, Allen H. Turner, James W. Warren Album ID: 836714 Photo ID: 25573761

Black History

albert edward forsytheTuskegee Airman….

Albert E. Forsyth, who was born in Nassau, Bahamas, in 1897, was brought to Port Antonio in Jamaica in his early childhood.  Forsyth left the island in 1911 to continue his education first at the Tuskegee Institute and later at the Universities of Illinois and Toledo in the United States, where he graduated with the degree of Batchelor of Science. A year later he began the study of medicine at McGill University in Canada, graduating in 1930 with the degrees of Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Surgery.  Dr. Albert E. Forsythe was Charles Anderson’s comrade in Arms. Forsythe who was actually a doctor by profession, was among the first African Americans to receive their pilots license. Forsythe is mostly known for his heroic Goodwill flights which sole purposes was to show what African Americans could do as skilled aviators; because at that time it was thought that blacks were inferior to whites in aviation and did not have the mental capabilities to pilot an aircraft. The first Goodwill flight he flew was from Atlantic City, NJ where Dr. Albert had been practicing medicine, to Los Angeles. He flew with only a compass and altimeter. He had no radio, no lights, and no parachute. All they had for navigation was their compass and a McNally road map; which flew out of Forsythe’s hands during the return flight. Forsythe and Charles flew many more different flights and by this time they were known world wide. After many flights Forsythe returned to medicine after he was extremely well known. “My main business was medicine….I was not interested in becoming involved much in aviation. We just made a series of flights for the sole purpose of opening the road for blacks who wanted to fly.” Forsythe had said after he was done with aviation. Forsythe Later died in 1984.

Article courtesy of: http://bonitajamaica.blogspot.com/2007/02/dr-albert-e-forsyth-aviator-and.html and https://shardlowcr0607.wikispaces.com/Significant+People+of+the+Tuskegee+Airmen

 

Black History

Robert Marshall GlassmanTuskegee Airman….

Robert M. Glass was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on December 17, 1920; he died on January 24th, 1955. Already a qualified pilot, Robert Marshall Glass was one of the highly skilled and committed young men to join the 332nd Fighter Group of the Tuskegee Airmen. Glass was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he attended public school. He graduated from Carnegie Institute of Technology with a degree in mechanical engineering.

Glass signed up at Tuskegee Army Air Field on January 28, 1943, and attended cadet school at Tuskegee. Charles “Chief” Anderson was one of his flying instructors at Tuskegee and Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., was his commanding officer. Glass served his country in World War II and during Korean conflict. He was a senior pilot with the Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medial, EAME Campaign medal, American Campaign Medal, Distinguished Unit Citation and the National Defense Service medal. His last duty station was a Wright Air Development Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. At the time of his death, Captain Glass was at the Air Command Staff School, Maxwell Air Force Base. His name is inscribed on the Memorial Honor Roll of Air Force Aid Society, Washington, D.C.

Already a qualified pilot, Robert Marshall Glass was one of the highly skilled and committed young men to join the 332nd Fighter Group of the Tuskegee Airmen. Glass was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he attended public school. He graduated from Carnegie Institute of Technology with a degree in mechanical engineering.

Glass signed up at Tuskegee Army Air Field on January 28, 1943, and attended cadet school at Tuskegee. Charles “Chief” Anderson was one of his flying instructors at Tuskegee and Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., was his commanding officer.

Black History

Charles AndrsonTuskegee Airman…

Charles “Chief” Anderson passed away at age 89 in his home in Tuskegee, Alabama, he suffered from colon cancer. Charles Anderson was a very significant person with the Tuskegee Airmen. He was an important person because he was the one who persuaded towards the training of military aviation at Tuskegee Institute. He was also a Chief flight instructor while Tuskegee was doing the CPTP or the Civilian Pilot Training Program. He also taught civilian pilot training at Howard University, D.C. Chief gave Eleanor Roosevelt a plane ride because she thought that blacks couldn’t fly airplanes. He gave her a ride and then she returned thinking otherwise. The CPT was also a big boost for the training of blacks in the military. As the Chief Flight Instructor Charles trained over 1,000 blacks at Moton Field.

Black History

Captain Benjamin O. Davis, JrTuskegee Airman…..

Benjamin O. Davis Jr., First Black General in Air Force

Benjamin O. Davis Jr., 89, a pioneering military officer who was the leader of the fabled Tuskegee Airmen during World War II and the first African American to become a General in the Air Force, died July 4, 2002, at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. He had Alzheimer’s disease.

In a career that began in the days of segregation, General Davis, who was born in Washington and lived here for much of his life, compiled a long history of achievements and accomplishments. His combat record and that of the unit he led have been credited with playing a major role in prompting the integration of the armed services after World War II.

In 1970, after retiring from the Air Force, he supervised the federal sky marshal program that was designed to quell a rash of airliner hijackings. In 1971, he was named an assistant secretary of transportation. At the time he left the Air Force as a Lieutenant General, wearing three stars, he was the senior black officer in the armed forces. In 1998, President Bill Clinton awarded General Davis his fourth star, advancing him to full general. “General Davis is here today as living proof that a person can overcome adversity and discrimination, achieve great things, turn skeptics into believers; and through example and perseverance, one person can bring truly extraordinary change,” Clinton said.

As the World War II commander of the 332nd Fighter Group, General Davis and his pilots escorted bombers on 200 air combat missions over Europe, flying into the teeth of some of the Nazi Luftwaffe’s most tenacious defenses. It was one of the 332nd’s proudest achievements that not one of the bombers it protected was lost to an enemy fighter.

Article courtesy of: http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/bodavisjr.htm