400 Calorie Meals

pork-chops-apple-salad_300Pork Tenderloin With Cabbage and Apple Slaw

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil l
  • 2 pork tenderloins (1 1/4 pounds total)
  • kosher salt and black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 small Napa cabbage (about 1 pound) -quartered, cored, and thinly sliced
  • 1 crisp red apple (such as Gala or Fuji), cut into thin wedges
  • 1/4 cup fresh cilantro

Directions

  1. Heat oven to 400° F. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat.
  2. Season the pork with ½ teaspoon each salt and pepper and cook, turning occasionally, until browned, 6 to 8 minutes.
  3. Transfer the skillet to the oven and roast until the pork is cooked through, 12 to 14 minutes. Let rest at least 5 minutes before slicing.
  4. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, combine the vinegar, honey, remaining 2 tablespoons of oil, and ¼ teaspoon each salt and pepper.
  5. Add the cabbage and apples and toss. Let sit for at least 5 minutes, tossing occasionally. Fold in the cilantro and serve with the pork.

Nutritional Information

Per Serving (no more than 4 ounces of lean meat, and 1 cup each of cabbage and apple slaw)

  • Calories 321Calories From Fat 42%
  • Protein 32g
  • Carbohydrate 12g

Recipe Courtesy of: http://www.realsimple.com

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